A Walk through History

Typically, most people with a predilection for collecting turn to everyday items, such as stamps, figurines, sports memorabilia, books, shoes, or records to name just a few obsessions. But not Henry Ford. By virtue of Ford’s bottomless budget, and his insatiable curiosity, his path to collecting took him through time itself, because Henry Ford collected significant relics of history and personal sentiment, and planted them across 80 acres in Dearborn, Michigan.

He called it Greenfield Village, making it the largest museum of its kind in the world.

Plaza fountain

Greenfield Village originally operated as an experimental school known as Edison Institute in 1929 (as a nod to his dearest friend) before opening to the public as an outdoor museum in 1933.

Ford, mused, “I am collecting the history of our people as written into things their hands made and used…. When we are through, we shall have reproduced American life as lived, and that, I think, is the best way of preserving at least a part of our history and tradition…”

There are over 100 original or replicated buildings filled with hundreds of thousands of artifacts and Americana intended to preserve authenticity. Additionally, costumed spokespeople throughout the complex tell antecdotes of historical nature, fully re-enacting an experience that captures an earlier time in America.

Baseball pitch

baseball sidelines

If there was a homestead that had historical value or childhood sentiment to Henry Ford, and it stood in the way of progress, then Henry seized the moment and had the house razed and moved to Michigan for restoration.

As excerpted from Telling America’s Story–A History of the Henry Ford:

In 1919, a road improvement project in Ford’s hometown of Springwells Township, Michigan (now the city of Dearborn), meant his birthplace would need to be either moved 200 yards from its original location – or destroyed.

Ford-Home-Original-Site-c.1880

Ford decided to move the house and restore it to the way it looked at the time of his mother’s death in 1876, when he was 13 years old. Ford personally took charge of the birthplace restoration, meticulously recreating the details of the house down to the original or similar furnishings.

 

Ford home

Ford Home sign

For example, Ford remembered sitting by a Starlight stove in the dining room as a child. After 18 months of searching, he discovered the exact make and model on a porch in Stockbridge, Michigan, which he purchased for $25 and loaded into his car for the journey back to Dearborn. And when he couldn’t find the precise pattern of dishes his mother had used, he had the original site of his birthplace excavated and had replicas made from the pottery shards found.

Ford Living Room

Ford family kitchen

Ford bedroom1

Ford dedicated the restoration of his childhood home to his mother’s memory and her teachings, particularly noting her love of family, her belief in the value of hard work, in learning “not from the school books but from life,” and her belief in trusting one’s intuition. His mother had encouraged his early tinkering and youthful inventions, and he felt sure she had set him on his unique path in life.

The rest is history…

And it’s all organized into seven historic districts: Working Farms;

steam tractor

windmill

farm equipment

Liberty Craftworks;

Spofford Sawmill at Greenfield Village - Dearborn, Michigan

Henry Ford’s Model T;

Model T ride

15 millionth

1931 Model AA Bus

Railroad Junction;

Roundhouse sign

Steam engine roundhouse

Engine 45

Edison 1

Main Street;

Village Pavillian

Bell Tower

MM Chapel sign

Martha-Mary Chapel

Wight Cycle sign

Wright Cycle Shop

Wright cycle build

Wright plane build

Heinz House sign

Heinz House

Heinz House Ad

Porches & Parlors;

Susquehanna Plantation sign

Susquehanna Plantation house

Slave quarters sign

Slave Quarters

Robert Frost home sign

Robert Frost home

Plympton Family home sign

Plympton Family home

Luther Burbank sign

Luther Burbank house

Cotswold Cottage sign

Coswold Cottage

Coswold Cottage gardens

Noah Webster Home sign

Noah Webster home

Webster's Dictionary

Farris Windmill sign

Farris Windmill

and Edison at Work, which is a future subject unto itself.

As one might expect, walking through history can be exhausting. Leah’s iPhone calculated that we hiked nearly 5 miles around the village in 3 hours, although there was still so much more to see and do. However, it was a hot and humid day, and apropos to Henry Ford, we simply ran out of gas and steam.

Or, to bastardize a famous Edison quote, we were inspired while we perspired!

 

 

8 thoughts on “A Walk through History

  1. WOW…this was a lot of info in one e-mail!! First, I’m glad Heinz made horseradish before ketchup!!! Can you imagine I never heard the name Luther Burbank…If it wasn’t for him we wouldn’t have the Idaho Potato!! …And I can see Noah Webster turning in his grave if he knew about the computer!! Good stuff…I am inspired!!
    Thanks……………………..S

    Liked by 1 person

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